Royal Wedding Miscellanea

If you’ve read my books (or even the descriptions of them), I’m sure you won’t be surprised that I’m sitting here waiting for the wedding to start.  I’m poking around trying to find the links on web pages I told myself I’d look up later and never got around to.  Here are a couple good ones if you’re waiting too.

Don't my books look very smart next to the Royal Wedding Program? Makes the whole shelf look better

Here is where you can download a free .pdf copy of the Official Royal Wedding Program at the Official Royal Wedding Page.  I’ve been flipping through it, and it’s very nice.  I think I’ll get some nice matte photo paper and print it out later.  I think I have some somewhere around here. http://www.officialroyalwedding2011.org./blog/2011/April/28/Royal-Wedding-update–Official-programme–including-Order-of-Service–available-online-1

You can also get it free for your iPod etc from the iBookstore (not iTunes store, which confused me for a little while.  Use the British spelling “programme” when you search for it, which also confused me even though I know that’s how they spell it.)

And a recipe for chocolate biscuit cake from Good Morning America. 

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/recipe?id=13476749

It sounds yummy; I wish I had time to make some before the wedding.  I’d also like to try it with white chocolate.  I bet that would be good. 

And I think this is one of the neatest souvenirs; you can knit your own royal wedding.  I haven’t bought the book, but I am tempted.

http://www.amazon.com/Knit-Your-Own-Royal-Wedding/dp/1449409245

If you’re curious, I’m having Walker shortbread, Twining’s tea, and vanilla cupcakes from Whole Foods and I am knitting an entrelac afghan.  Now I just have to decide if I should wear a hat or a tiara.

This is an entrelac scarf very similar to the afghan I'm working on. It seemed easier to show you what I meant than to try and explain it.

A Few Links to Tours

When I wrote about the Cathedral de Tours last time, I said I’d try to find some pictures of the nearby Musee de Beaux-Arts.  Here they are.

This is one of the statues outside

Another outdoor statue

A small statue inside

Not many, I know, but that’s what I have.

When I was there, I went to the Institute de Touraine.  Here’s one of the nicer classrooms.  I had literature in here.

There were a few interesting places that I couldn’t find pictures from.  One was the château, which is also in the area around the cathedral. It’s a historical wax museum, and was one of my favorite museums in Tours. I liked it better than Madame Tousseau’s in London, where the figures are all sort of in little vignettes but in the same room. In the château, there are some figures done in those kinds of dioramas, like the Battle of Poitiers/Tours, which really couldn’t be shown full out without a ton of outdoor space, but most of the displays use the rooms to really good effect. The best one was the death of Richard I (Lionheart). It took up the entire room it was in, the lighting made it look like the room was lit by a fire and torches, and the angles that you looked at the scene really made it look convincingly real. There were several that were set up like that: da Vinci  painting, Catherine di Medici watching the St. Barthomew’s Day massacre, Cardinal Richelieu plotting.

The other really interesting museum was the Musée de Compagnonnage. It took my a while to get what this was about, but one of my teacher’s had been involved as a “mother” and explained it to us. It’s the old (as in Medieval) system of apprenticeship. After being an apprentice in a field, the next step is journeyman, where you travel around and learn from different masters until you’ve learned enough to be a master yourself. There are still some fields in France that use this system, which makes sense when you think about the cathedral, those masons had to learn to cut the stone and make gargoyles somewhere, you can’t just order that kind of thing. The mothers used to put the journeymen up in their houses as they worked in different towns; I was a little unclear as to whether they still do that, or act more as a welcome wagon to get them settled into the new town. In any case, to become a master, they must submit a project showing mastery of the craft, and that’s what is in the museum, projects from hundreds of years of newly made masters.

And finally, a few links

The City of Tours web page in French

And in English

The Musee de Compagnonnage

I couldn’t find an official page for the Chateau, but this has a picture

 

edited to add links to the other posts in this series

This is the book I was working on when I was researching Tours. Click to read the first few chapters

Photographs of Roman Ruins in Tours, France

Old City of Tours, France

Photos of the Cathedral St. Gatien de Tours, France

A Few Links to Tours

Not part of the Tours series, but still in the area

Villandry and Ella’s garden

Photos of the Cathedral St. Gatien de Tours, France

I promised pictures of the Cathedral St.-Gatien, and here they are.  When I was there, the cathedral was in mid-restoration (it seems like something’s always mid-restoration when I’m there), so I got to watch the masons cutting stone to replace what needed replacing, which was interesting, and I took this picture of a sign explaining the history of the area.

The cathedral is not near the old city, it’s actually on the other side of the Rue Nationale, which runs through the center of town. On one of the walking tours I took, they told us that the Rue Nationale was originally the Rue Royale, or Royal Road, in English it’s usually called the King’s Highway. During the Revolution, when they got rid of all signs of the monarchy, all towns that had part of the Rue Royal re-named them Rue Nationale.

But back to the cathedral. The old parts of Tours are split into two areas. The part with Place Plumereau and the remains of the Abby of St Martin, which was a pilgrimage site, was the economic area; the cathedral and chateau were in the old Roman walled city. Between them were vineyards and fields.

The cathedral is named Cathedral St. Gatien, after the first bishop of Tours. The first building there was built in the 4th century; the cathedral was built in parts from the 12th through the 16th, so there are a lot of different styles of Gothic architecture. The area around the doors (which seems like the front, but is really the back- the area around the altar is the front) is flamboyant style, with lots of carving, which is why I have lots of pictures of it.

The towers are French Renaissance style. You can see by the scaffolding in the first picture, they were part of the restoration, so I didn’t get to see much of them.

Behind the cathedral is what used to be the bishop’s residence. Now it’s the art museum.  I’ll see if I can find some pictures for next time.  And here’s an update on the picture I was messing about with in Daz Studio.  Ella and the Panther. 

 edited to add links to the other posts in this series

This is the book I was working on when I was researching Tours. Click to read the first few chapters

Photographs of Roman Ruins in Tours, France

Old City of Tours, France

Photos of the Cathedral St. Gatien de Tours, France

A Few Links to Tours

Not part of the Tours series, but still in the area

Villandry and Ella’s garden

my web page is www.lisaannenisula.com copyright 2010, 2011 Lisa Anne Nisula
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